CULTURE MAGAZINE

Munch. Trembling Earth

18.11.23 - 01.04.24

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Edvard Munch - Self-portrait in front of the house wall in Ekely, 1926
Oil on canvas, 92 × 73 cm
Munchmuseet, Oslo
Edvard Munch – Self-portrait in front of the house wall in Ekely, 1926
Oil on canvas, 92 × 73 cm
Munchmuseet, Oslo

Munch’s view of nature

The Museum Barberini in Potsdam is presenting the special exhibition “Munch. Trembling Earth”, which focuses on the nature paintings of the famous Norwegian artist Edvard Munch. This exhibition, in co-operation with the Clark Art Institute in Williamstown, USA, and the Munch Museum in Oslo, offers a unique insight into Munch’s intensive exploration of nature. Over 110 works, including some of his best-known motifs as well as rarely shown works, form the core of this exhibition. It sheds light on Munch’s landscape depictions, an aspect of his oeuvre that has received less attention to date.

Edvard Munch - Girl on the Bridge, 1902
Oil on canvas, 100 × 102 cm
Private collection
Edvard Munch – Girl on the Bridge, 1902
Oil on canvas, 100 × 102 cm
Private collection

Insights into Munch’s understanding of nature

The exhibition explores the role of nature in Munch’s work. Known for his depictions of human emotion, nature played an equally central role in his artistic expression. Munch used natural motifs to pose questions about man’s position in the cosmic cycle of life. The exhibition in Potsdam presents a variety of landscapes – from sweeping coastlines to stormy scenes – and shows how Munch used these natural scenes to reflect his inner feelings and conflicts.

Edvard Munch - Summer Night on the Beach, 1902/03
Oil on canvas, 103 × 120 cm
Private collection
Edvard Munch – Summer Night on the Beach, 1902/03
Oil on canvas, 103 × 120 cm
Private collection

The significance of Munch’s landscape paintings

It also shows how Munch used landscape as an artistic medium to express his personal and philosophical ideas. This perspective offers a new look at Munch’s work and its significance in modern art. Exhibition curator Jill Lloyd places particular emphasis on reflecting the artistic, scientific and philosophical influences that contributed to Munch’s unique understanding of nature. Particular attention is paid to the presentation of Munch’s assembly hall paintings for the University of Oslo, which have not been seen in Germany for over a century.

Edvard Munch - Woman with Pumpkin, 1942
Oil on canvas, 130 × 100.5 cm
Munchmuseet, Oslo
Edvard Munch – Woman with Pumpkin, 1942
Oil on canvas, 130 × 100.5 cm
Munchmuseet, Oslo

Significance in the present

“Munch. Trembling Earth” not only opens up new perspectives on Munch’s work, but also offers current references, especially in view of the current approach to nature. The exhibition shows how Munch’s works can serve as a sounding board for contemporary discussions about nature and mankind. The exhibition, which has already received great acclaim in the USA, will also be on show at MUNCH in Oslo after its time at the Museum Barberini, emphasising the continuing relevance and appeal of Munch’s work.

Further information

The exhibition “Munch. Trembling Earth” (Advertisement) on the website of the Museum Barberini.

Book cover "Trembling Earth"
© Prestel
Book cover “Trembling Earth”
© Prestel

Exhibition book

The book “Munch. Lebenslandschaft” (Trembling Earth), published by Prestel Verlag, complements the exhibition of the same name at the Museum Barberini. The richly illustrated book brings together around 90 of his works, including important loans from renowned institutions such as the Munchmuseet in Oslo, the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Dallas Museum of Art, the Staatsgalerie Stuttgart, the Museum Folkwang in Essen and the Von der Heydt-Museum in Wuppertal.

TitleMunch. Lebenslandschaft (Trembling Earth)
AuthorOrtrud Westheider, Michael Philipp, Daniel Zamani
PublisherPrestel
CoverHardcover
Pages256
LanguageGerman
Dimensions30,8 x 24,9 cm
ISBN978-3-7913-7702-5
Price45,00 €
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